Why in the world did the TSA add a checkmark and a trademark symbol to the URL for their TSA Pre✓™ program?
Those characters are even contained in the canonical URL that’s set for the page. If you happen to type in the URL without the two special characters, it 404s instead of helpfully redirecting you to the actual page you were trying to reach. The same thing happens if you type in “/tsa-precheck/” or “/tsa-pre-check/” at the end. 
Why? How do they expect anyone to type that? Who thought this was a good idea?
(via TSA Pre✓™ | Transportation Security Administration)

Why in the world did the TSA add a checkmark and a trademark symbol to the URL for their TSA Pre✓™ program?

Those characters are even contained in the canonical URL that’s set for the page. If you happen to type in the URL without the two special characters, it 404s instead of helpfully redirecting you to the actual page you were trying to reach. The same thing happens if you type in “/tsa-precheck/” or “/tsa-pre-check/” at the end. 

Why? How do they expect anyone to type that? Who thought this was a good idea?

(via TSA Pre✓™ | Transportation Security Administration)

Same-sex couples won the right to marry on Monday.

Gov. Chris Gregoire signed a measure legalizing gay marriage in a ceremony in Olympia on Monday. It made Washington the seventh state to legalize same-sex marriage.

A tearful Gregoire announced: “We’re here to make history here in the great state of Washington..This is a very proud day…A day that we did what was right, what was just, what was fair.”

(via seattlepi.com)

Like.

Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen, D-Camano Island, said she supports gay marriage legislation in the Senate — giving proponents the 25 votes needed for passage.

The state House already has enough lawmakers in support of the measure to approve it. Gov. Chris Gregoire backs the bill, as well.

Haugen issued announced her support immediately after a two-hour legislative hearing in Olympia about the bill.

(via Seattle Times)

Piece by piece, Taiwan official cracks $ puzzle

Liu Hui-fen spent seven days completing a puzzle with a payoff — by far the most difficult she’s ever attempted as the Taiwan Justice Ministry official in charge of helping citizens piece together currency that has been mangled.
With an aide, Liu cobbled together thousands of tiny paper money pieces worth 200,000 New Taiwan dollars ($6,600) in total and returned them to their owner Thursday.
The man, who only gave his surname, Lin, said he accidentally dumped a plastic bag containing 200 $1,000 Taiwan bills into an industrial scrap machine last month — and each were torn into some 20 pieces. He later went to the Justice Ministry’s Investigation Bureau where Liu works to ask for help.

(via World news - msnbc.com)

Piece by piece, Taiwan official cracks $ puzzle

Liu Hui-fen spent seven days completing a puzzle with a payoff — by far the most difficult she’s ever attempted as the Taiwan Justice Ministry official in charge of helping citizens piece together currency that has been mangled.

With an aide, Liu cobbled together thousands of tiny paper money pieces worth 200,000 New Taiwan dollars ($6,600) in total and returned them to their owner Thursday.

The man, who only gave his surname, Lin, said he accidentally dumped a plastic bag containing 200 $1,000 Taiwan bills into an industrial scrap machine last month — and each were torn into some 20 pieces. He later went to the Justice Ministry’s Investigation Bureau where Liu works to ask for help.

(via World news - msnbc.com)

Candidate supports troops, but flier shows Germans
A North Carolina legislator has apologized after a campaign flier that was meant to cast him as military-friendly featured a photo portraying advancing German World War II soldiers.
The direct-mail political consulting firm that produced the promotional piece designed to boost N.C. Rep. Tim Spear, D-Washington, said it was solely responsible for the mistake. He is running against Republican Bob Steinberg.
The flier destined for about 10,000 homes in Spear’s district was headlined: “In North Carolina, One Legislator is Covering Our Soldiers’ Backs.” It described Spear’s support for military-friendly legislation, including bills that made it harder to foreclose the homes of active-duty service members.
The art department at Washington, D.C.-based MSHC Partners found a  photo that visually captured the Spear’s message, but no one noticed  that it showed the backs of four advancing World War II re-enactors  dressed in German army uniforms, senior account executive Mike Brown  said Wednesday.
(via The Rocky Mount Telegram)

Candidate supports troops, but flier shows Germans

A North Carolina legislator has apologized after a campaign flier that was meant to cast him as military-friendly featured a photo portraying advancing German World War II soldiers.

The direct-mail political consulting firm that produced the promotional piece designed to boost N.C. Rep. Tim Spear, D-Washington, said it was solely responsible for the mistake. He is running against Republican Bob Steinberg.

The flier destined for about 10,000 homes in Spear’s district was headlined: “In North Carolina, One Legislator is Covering Our Soldiers’ Backs.” It described Spear’s support for military-friendly legislation, including bills that made it harder to foreclose the homes of active-duty service members.

The art department at Washington, D.C.-based MSHC Partners found a photo that visually captured the Spear’s message, but no one noticed that it showed the backs of four advancing World War II re-enactors dressed in German army uniforms, senior account executive Mike Brown said Wednesday.

(via The Rocky Mount Telegram)

Super salmon or ‘Frankenfish’? FDA to decide
A genetically engineered AquAdvantage Salmon (background) alongside an Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground) (Reuters).
A Massachusetts company wants to market a genetically engineered version  of Atlantic salmon, and regulators are weighing the request. If  approval is given, it would be the first time the government allowed  such modified animals to join the foods that go onto the nation’s dinner tables.
(via Health - Food safety - msnbc.com)

Super salmon or ‘Frankenfish’? FDA to decide

A genetically engineered AquAdvantage Salmon (background) alongside an Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground) (Reuters).

A Massachusetts company wants to market a genetically engineered version of Atlantic salmon, and regulators are weighing the request. If approval is given, it would be the first time the government allowed such modified animals to join the foods that go onto the nation’s dinner tables.

(via Health - Food safety - msnbc.com)