I Know Where Your Cat Lives is a data experiment that visualizes a sample of 1 million public pics of cats on a world map, locating them by the latitude and longitude coordinates embedded in their metadata. The cats were accessed via publicly available APIs provided by popular photo sharing websites. The photos were then run through various clustering algorithms using a supercomputer at Florida State University in order to represent the enormity of the data source. This project explores two uses of the internet: the sociable and humorous appreciation of domesticated felines, and the status quo of personal data usage by startups and international megacorps who are riding the wave of decreased privacy for all. This website doesn’t visualize all of the cats on the net, only the ones that allow you to track where their owners have been.

This is a video of people using We See In Every Direction

We See In Every Direction (2013) is a Web browser for collaborative, synchronized surfing by Swedish artist Jonas Lund. Browsing the Internet is typically an intimate and personal experience for just one individual, but in We See, users traverse online information streams in a collective surfing environment. Users can type, click and change URLs in real time together; they can jockey for control of the browser – akin to fighting for the TV remote – or choose to sit back and let their friends take care of the surfing. Like many of Lund’s previous online works, the piece opens up the oft-private, walled gardens of the Internet.

(We See In Every Direction Official Surf Party by JONAS LUND)

Why in the world did the TSA add a checkmark and a trademark symbol to the URL for their TSA Pre✓™ program?
Those characters are even contained in the canonical URL that’s set for the page. If you happen to type in the URL without the two special characters, it 404s instead of helpfully redirecting you to the actual page you were trying to reach. The same thing happens if you type in “/tsa-precheck/” or “/tsa-pre-check/” at the end. 
Why? How do they expect anyone to type that? Who thought this was a good idea?
(via TSA Pre✓™ | Transportation Security Administration)

Why in the world did the TSA add a checkmark and a trademark symbol to the URL for their TSA Pre✓™ program?

Those characters are even contained in the canonical URL that’s set for the page. If you happen to type in the URL without the two special characters, it 404s instead of helpfully redirecting you to the actual page you were trying to reach. The same thing happens if you type in “/tsa-precheck/” or “/tsa-pre-check/” at the end. 

Why? How do they expect anyone to type that? Who thought this was a good idea?

(via TSA Pre✓™ | Transportation Security Administration)

…But then one gray morning did Internet Explorer 6 no longer load The Google. Refresh was clicked, again and again, but still did Internet Explorer 6 not load The Google. Perhaps The Google was broken, the people thought, but then The Yahoo too did not load. Nor did Hotmail. Nor USAToday.com. The land was thrown into panic. Internet Explorer 6 was minimized then maximized. The Compaq Presario was unplugged then plugged back in. The old mouse was brought out and plugged in beside the new mouse. Still, The Google did not load….