Yes, that is a very bad idea.
Swedish Man Dies After Having Sex With Hornet’s Nest

The 35-year-old, known only as Hasse, had 146 sting marks on his body, including 54 to his genitals, News Sweden said…
…”To attempt to have intercourse with a hornet’s nest is a very bad idea,” Siv During Livh, a psychologist and expert on sex fantasies told the news website.

(via IBTimes UK)

Yes, that is a very bad idea.

Swedish Man Dies After Having Sex With Hornet’s Nest

The 35-year-old, known only as Hasse, had 146 sting marks on his body, including 54 to his genitals, News Sweden said…

…”To attempt to have intercourse with a hornet’s nest is a very bad idea,” Siv During Livh, a psychologist and expert on sex fantasies told the news website.

(via IBTimes UK)

I hear it can also swim and loves to hide under your covers.
New tarantula is as big as your face — and poisonous, too

The newest spider to give arachnophobes the willies, a tarantula named Poecilotheria rajaei has been discovered on the island nation of Sri Lanka.
With a leg span of 8 inches (20 centimeters) and enough venom to kill mice, lizards, small birds and snakes, according to Sky News, the crawler is covered in subtle markings of gray, pink and daffodil yellow.

(photo by Ranil Nanayakkara / British Tarantula Society via Science on NBCNews.com)

I hear it can also swim and loves to hide under your covers.

New tarantula is as big as your face — and poisonous, too

The newest spider to give arachnophobes the willies, a tarantula named Poecilotheria rajaei has been discovered on the island nation of Sri Lanka.

With a leg span of 8 inches (20 centimeters) and enough venom to kill mice, lizards, small birds and snakes, according to Sky News, the crawler is covered in subtle markings of gray, pink and daffodil yellow.

(photo by Ranil Nanayakkara / British Tarantula Society via Science on NBCNews.com)

California Conservation Corps members taught their big, country-ish boss to dance!

California Conservation Corps members Antwon McCoy and Leonard Patton aren’t just hard workers. They are also very good dancers who have taught their big nature nerd/mountain man boss (John Griffith) more than a few dance moves. When they aren’t busting moves, all three do a lot of trail building, salmon habitat restoration, and tree planting in the CCC.

This is incredible. I think the only way it could have been better is if he had actually moonwalked across the line.

Moonwalk

The ultimate full moon shot. Dean Potter walks a highline at Cathedral Peak as the sun sets and the moon rises. Shot from over 1 mile away with a Canon 800mm and 2X by Michael Schaefer. mikeylikesrocks.com

This shot was part of a bigger project for National Geographic called The Man Who Can Fly. channel.nationalgeographic.com/videos/the-man-who-can-fly/

(by Bryan Smith)

Peter Liu: Lions of the Sea

The image above was taken while diving at Carlos Beach in Monterey, California. “This particular shot was a fluke that occurred on the way back from a dive,” Liu says. “One of my strobe arms got wrapped around a strand of kelp and I was untangling it when I turned around and noticed these curious sea lions following me back. I took the opportunity and pressed the shutter, even though the camera was still tangled and I didn’t have time to really frame the shot or get the settings right. It was terribly underexposed. It took some doing to coax the shot out later in Photoshop, but it was well worth it. The accidental composition is priceless.” - Peter Liu

(photo by Peter Liu via PDN Photo of the Day)

Peter Liu: Lions of the Sea

The image above was taken while diving at Carlos Beach in Monterey, California. “This particular shot was a fluke that occurred on the way back from a dive,” Liu says. “One of my strobe arms got wrapped around a strand of kelp and I was untangling it when I turned around and noticed these curious sea lions following me back. I took the opportunity and pressed the shutter, even though the camera was still tangled and I didn’t have time to really frame the shot or get the settings right. It was terribly underexposed. It took some doing to coax the shot out later in Photoshop, but it was well worth it. The accidental composition is priceless.” - Peter Liu

(photo by Peter Liu via PDN Photo of the Day)

Timing.
Nature’s Best Photography: Vine Snake in Choco, Colombia

Photographer’s comments: “I was scrambling through bushes, wading up streams, and looking for anything scaly or slimy in one of the most bio-diverse forests in the world when we came across this vine snake. I was lying on my stomach to frame the shot when, as if on cue, a fly buzzed down and used the snake’s head as a landing pad. As soon as I clicked the shutter, the fly departed. Some photographs come about through careful and diligent planning, but this one was about being in the right place at the right time.”

(photo by Robin Moore / Nature’s Best Photography via PhotoBlog)

Timing.

Nature’s Best Photography: Vine Snake in Choco, Colombia

Photographer’s comments: “I was scrambling through bushes, wading up streams, and looking for anything scaly or slimy in one of the most bio-diverse forests in the world when we came across this vine snake. I was lying on my stomach to frame the shot when, as if on cue, a fly buzzed down and used the snake’s head as a landing pad. As soon as I clicked the shutter, the fly departed. Some photographs come about through careful and diligent planning, but this one was about being in the right place at the right time.”

(photo by Robin Moore / Nature’s Best Photography via PhotoBlog)

Southern exposure for auroral lights

A picture from the International Space Station, provided Saturday by Dutch astronaut Andre Kuipers, shows southern lights between Antarctica and Australia.

"We can actually fly into the auroras," space station resident Don Pettit said recently. “It’s like being shrunk down and put inside of a neon sign.”

(photo by ESA/NASA via PhotoBlog)

Southern exposure for auroral lights

A picture from the International Space Station, provided Saturday by Dutch astronaut Andre Kuipers, shows southern lights between Antarctica and Australia.

"We can actually fly into the auroras," space station resident Don Pettit said recently. “It’s like being shrunk down and put inside of a neon sign.”

(photo by ESA/NASA via PhotoBlog)