This is a picture of the sun.
Thrill to a sunspot’s parting shot

A particularly angry region of the sun has been throwing some strong solar storms toward us over the past week, but there’s just one more blast to weather. This picture, from astrophotographer Alan Friedman, shows active region 1429 as it rolls toward the edge of the sun’s disk.throwing

The sunspot region known as AR1429 seethes in a picture of the sun, captured on March 11 in hydrogen-alpha light by photographer Alan Friedman.
(photo by Alan Friedman / Averted Imagination via PhotoBlog)

This is a picture of the sun.

Thrill to a sunspot’s parting shot

A particularly angry region of the sun has been throwing some strong solar storms toward us over the past week, but there’s just one more blast to weather. This picture, from astrophotographer Alan Friedman, shows active region 1429 as it rolls toward the edge of the sun’s disk.throwing

The sunspot region known as AR1429 seethes in a picture of the sun, captured on March 11 in hydrogen-alpha light by photographer Alan Friedman.

(photo by Alan Friedman / Averted Imagination via PhotoBlog)

Mount Rainier sunrise from Ingraham Flats

This is a timelapse taken on Friday, 02 September, 2011, from the Ingraham Flats on Mt. Rainier in Washington. Some friends and I attempted a summit of the mountain with International Mountain Guides, but we were unable to reach the top due to high winds.

When we returned to camp after our summit attempt, I set up my GoPro Hero camera to take pictures at five-second intervals. This video represents about two hours of footage of the sunrise over Little Tahoma taken while we rested and prepared for our descent back to Paradise. Toward the end of the video, you might be able to see that the composition of the shot changes. This is due to the sun melting the snow on which the camera was resting.

The people who appear in the video facing away from the camera while standing just to the left of Little Tahoma are peeing.

(by evannstrathern)